We should not label our children as Christian, Muslim or any other religious group. So big NO to faith schools.

Asif, London

Religious views should not be impressed upon others. We should not have religion involved in dictating law, meddling in politics and education.

Pauline, Banbury

"David Cameron's 'Big Society' appears to be pushing towards a greater role for religion-based organisations instead of connecting with all people."

Karen, Northamptonshire

When selecting a school for my kid, I checked it wasn't focused towards just Christianity. I have no issues with schools teaching about religions and beliefs equally, but don't want my young and impressionable children to be exposed to evangelical practices.

Peter, Leeds

What prompted me to join was simply that I had had enough of religious organisations establishing themselves as being above criticism. That it is not possible to criticise religious practices without being told that you are being offensive scares me.

Anon

"I am angry with what I view as the permitted brainwashing of children within our education system. Myself and my wife joined the NSS to help protect children from adults with religious and faith based agendas."

Timothy, London

I have come to appreciate that the NSS is often a lone voice of rationality in the wilderness that is dominated by religious dogma, bigotry and political manipulation.

Marcus, Milford Haven

I chose a non-denominational school for my son and yet he still has to take part in daily collective worship. A theatre group called "Open the Book" entertain his class once a week with Bible stories, in addition to an RE class. Religion should be taken out of schools altogether and more time spent on aspects of the curriculum relevant to adult life. Excluding him would however make him the odd-one-out.

Nicolle, London

I have long been convinced that the only way to fight religious extremism, and protect basic liberties, is to work towards a properly secular and democratic society, in which freedom of religious practice and expression (within the law) is safeguarded.

Stephen, Kent

Religion has had far too much privilege, power and protection for far too long. Humanity needs to evolve and the continued inclusion of superstitious beliefs in the affairs of state is not helping that process.

Alex, Southsea

"As a medical student, what concerns me most is NHS funding for hospital chaplains."

Brendan, Lisburn

I feel proud my membership money will go towards future successes in the fight for a fair and secular future for all.

Luke

I think all groups, religious, atheistic or agnostic, have enough common ground to be able to live together in harmony under secular systems of governance, law, welfare, education, etc.

Paula, Coalville

Religion should not provide a justification for discrimination, for breaching a person's human rights or for intolerance.

Stephen, Teddington

I joined the NSS because I believe in religious freedom and freedom from religion. I want Britain to be a forward-thinking, fair and rational place to live for everyone and for future generations.

Richard, Southampton

The privilege provided to religion within our society is intolerable. Secularism is being cynically attacked to preserve the status quo, and withdrawing religious privilege regarded as persecution. My local MP defends religious schools as he feels he has the right to send his children to a school with a Christian ethos – some local parents cannot find a non-religious school and have to fight for their children's rights. The NSS is effectively working to address these inequalities.

Dalis, Bucks

May I take this opportunity to mention that I think the NSS do an incredible job and I always look forward to reading the weekly bulletin. I feel that without people like you, religious groups would very likely run roughshod and their privileges would prevail. You will have my continued support.

Garry

'I am a realist rather than an idealist. That in the 21st century supernatural beliefs still have a significant influence in matters of state is 'unreal'. The valuable work of the NSS must be supported.'

Fi, Hampshire

I discovered the NSS while studying Politics at school, researching pressure groups. I was particularly interested in secularism, always held similar beliefs, and decided to join to promote the cause of religious freedom and equality.

Edward, Wiltshire

I feel secularism is a cause for which I can be politically and publicly active. Ultimately it's about removing the archaic rights given to religions to infringe my liberty.

Nicklas, Haywards Heath

"I have come to appreciate that the NSS is often a lone voice of rationality in the wilderness that is dominated by religious dogma, bigotry and political manipulation."

David, Shropshire

On many secular issues, atheists and many theists have common interests. By working together on these issues, voices will be louder. While I am no longer religious, I absolutely support people's right to religious freedom.

Tim, Cheltenham

The treatment of religious minorities, atheists and apostates in theocratic countries is sickening. Everyone should have the right to their own beliefs and religious choices, provided that they do not impinge on other people's rights.

Tim, Gloucestershire

I joined to show that being an NSS member is compatible with being a Muslim. I think the NSS would benefit from having more members of faith. At present, just as many believers fail to understand what secularism means, many who do not practice a religious faith fail to understand the provisions that a just society needs to make for people who do.

Mohammed Amin MBE, Manchester

Children can be segregated and discriminated against according to their parents' religion when it comes to school admissions. This worries me immensely. I am not looking forward to letting my children be taught superstition and myths as truth or separating them from their friends. The NSS is all we have to take on the might of these tax-exempt organisations given free access to our children by the state.

Martin, Darlington