Secularist of the Year is an opportunity to celebrate the outstanding groups and inspiring individuals advancing secularism and related human rights. The £5,000 prize for Secularist of the Year is presented annually.

The 2018 awards luncheon and social reception will be held on Saturday 24 March in central London, from 13.00-16.00 (registration from 12.30). Tickets, which are now on sale, include a three course meal and welcome drink.

Nominations for the award are now closed. Thank you for everyone who submitted.

The venue is fully accessible. If you have any mobility issues or would require extra help on the day please let us know.

Tickets are £40 for members and £50 for non-members.

Ticket sales close at 16.00 on Thursday 22 March 2018

Ticket sales are now closed

2018 shortlist

Phil Johnson and Rev Graham Sawyer, for their courageous campaigning work over many years to expose the institutional abuse of children and vulnerable adults in the Church of England in the face of institutional hostility.

Amina Lone, for her work at the Social Action & Research Foundation (SARF), and for fearlessly challenging both the Islamist and anti-Muslim far right and their apologists in the public sphere, particularly in education.

My Stealthy Freedom, for demonstrating the power of social movements – and individual acts of resistance however big or small – in challenging theocracy and the policing of their bodies by religious authorities. The group has encouraged Iranian women to discard their hijabs in public, in defiance of the country's Islamic authorities.

Maajid Nawaz, for his consistent advocacy, through his radio programme and Quilliam, of secularism and human rights, for his commitment to challenging all forms of extremism and to actively engaging with people with different views and beliefs.

Meena Varma, for her work as Director of Dalit Solidarity Network UK in challenging 'caste' discrimination reasons – through research, academic work and public advocacy.

WISS (Western Isles Secular Society), for standing up to the intrusion of religious control in the lives of their community, for combining secularist principles with social action, and for their commitment to including people of all faiths and none. WISS has organised to oppose Sabbatarian control of life in the Western Isles.