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We're concerned about the involvement of evangelical religious organisations in publicly funded schools through the provision of religious education, school worship, pastoral work and the setting up of prayer spaces and bible-based school clubs.

What’s the problem?

Our state schools are being targeted and exploited by evangelical groups as part of their missionary work. Schools are often acting with good intentions, but are too often naive and un-prepared to set appropriate boundaries. Meanwhile, parents are too often not informed of the visits of backgrounds of groups.

The legal obligation on all schools to provide a daily act of worship provides a foot in the door to organisations with evangelistic intentions. The ambiguity about the specific aims and purpose of religious education, and its low status in schools, provides an ideal environment for evangelical groups to exploit.

External groups can make a valuable educational contribution to schools. With the right boundaries in place, staff and parents can be assured of no inappropriate proselytization.

What are we doing?

Helping parents challenge inappropriate evangelism in schools is a major part of our casework. In 2013 we published a major report to highlight the problem of schools are being targeted and exploited by evangelical groups as part of their missionary work. We are working with schools to develop best practice for working with external visitors, and particularly religion and belief groups.

In autumn 2016 we asked a random selection of 150 non-faith and 150 faith schools about their external visitor policies as part of our research into evangelism in schools. Only 35% of schools had a policy or policies which covered the participation, invitation or behavior of external groups/visitors/speakers. Only 16% of schools had a policy or policies concerning the partisan promotion of religious or political beliefs by external groups/visitors/speakers.

None of the policies examined explicitly requires parents to be informed of visitors in advance. Although some schools told us this was normal practice. 66% of policies examined did recommend thorough research of the visitor in advance, rising to 79% among community schools (most other variations between faith and non-faith schools were low).

None of the policies clearly prohibited religious proselytization, nor required a teacher/staff member to introduce an external visitor and make clear that they are representing their religious views. Again some schools did say this was their practice. 57% of policies examined stipulated that a teacher or teaching assistant should always be present.

What you can do:

Take action

Please consider supporting our petition to end inappropriate evangelism in schools and writing to your MP to raise the issue.

Share

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Parents, pupils, and teachers: need advice?

Do you have concerns about inappropriate evangelism in your school? Want to set appropriate boundaries? Our campaigns pages have plenty of information, but of you need more, please:

More information

Operation Christmas Child/Samaritan's Purse

Looking for advice challenging this evangelical scheme in your school, workplace or society?


While you're here

Education is a huge part of our campaigning, policy and casework. Please consider a donation to enable us to continue making a difference.